Harvest Safety Tips

Fall is just a couple of weeks away and for many of us, that means harvest! During the fall harvest season, farmers will spend hours in equipment. That includes 'old pros' and younger, newer farmers as well. So, we are bringing a few tips as a friendly reminder to stay safe this harvest season!

Being in agriculture means you are no stranger to tough working conditions. It also means that you are in a potentially dangerous industry. And while farmers are smart and handy, they are also at risk. In 2010, close to 500 farmers and farm workers died from a work-related injury. And that is 500 too many.

Check out these important safety tips to consider as you prepare for harvest season this year:

Always wear seat belts.

Know where family members and workers are. Visibility is poor around large machinery and at night. Be sure to know where everyone is so that no one is in danger.

Put equipment in neutral or park, engage parking brake, and turn off engine before dismounting. Wait until all mechanisms have stopped moving before attempting to service or unclog a machine.

Limit riders on equipment!

Stay alert. Take breaks throughout the day. Be sure to have your cell phone charged in case you need to communicate or have a problem or emergency.

Get enough sleep.

Train all operators to safely operate the equipment.

Have all safety equipment in proper condition and ready to use such as safety glasses, hearing protection and respiratory masks.

Have ROPS (rollover protective structures) fitted on tractors.

Never stand on grain that is being moved. Every year people "drown" in grain carts and grain bins that are being emptied. Keep kids away from grain hauling equipment.

Keep grain auger grates and shields in place. Be sure your equipment is properly maintained to avoid breakdowns.

If you must move machinery on a roadway after dark, have all necessary working headlights and flashing front and rear warning lights. The better you can be seen the less likely you are to be hit by a motorists.

What did we miss? Share your recommended safety tips in the comments.

 

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Donna Blazek - Saturday, July 16, 2016 at 11:56:43 PM
I was driving a combine before it was "cool" I used to pull a 60 (yes) foot Wheat grain drill. I now live in Northern Wisconsin which was just devastated by rain. Pray for us all.

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